Background

Background

Critical background information on the issue of climate change resiliency for health care.

Toolkit

Toolkit

Facilities can use the Resiliency Toolkit to assess their resiliency to climate change.

Resiliency Profiles

Resiliency Profiles

Profiles of the resiliency efforts undertaken by several leading Canadian health care facilities.

Resources

Resources

All the latest resources related to climate change and health care facility resiliency.

Organisations

Organisations

Links to the organisations that are driving climate change resiliency for health care.

  • Background

    Background

  • Toolkit

    Toolkit

  • Resiliency Profiles

    Resiliency Profiles

  • Resources

    Resources

  • Organisations

    Organisations

Climate Change Resiliency for Health Care

Health care facilities in Canada are vulnerable to climate change impacts. Climate-related hazards create risks that can disrupt health care facility services and delivery.

Extreme weather events (e.g. storms, floods, wildfires, extreme temperature events) can create emergencies by damaging infrastructure, compromising access to critical resources (e.g. food and water) and the safety of patients, visitors and staff. Climate change increases risks of some infectious diseases (vector-, water- and food-borne, new and emerging) and contributes to worsening air quality. Climate-related hazards can have significant implications for demand on health care facility services.

Health care facilities can increase resiliency by increasing knowledge of climate-related risks to inform planning across a range of areas (e.g. emergency management). A resilient health care facility is also one that commits to sustainable practices, such as water and energy conservation, promoting active transportation, and local food procurement. In investing in resiliency activities in these areas, health care facilities can reduce operating costs and increase resilience in the community.

The health community has a critical role in the response to climate change. The emerging evidence and experience in this area suggests that to be fully effective, this requires a broad public health approach, including not only the preventive and curative functions that are under direct control of the formal health sector, but also appropriate leadership, guidance and regulatory roles with regard to health-determining sectors and functions, such as water and sanitation, or disaster risk reduction.
World Health Organization