Cooking Oil


COOKING OIL

A vegetable oil is a triglyceride extracted from a plant, used in cooking.

 

HEALTH CARE CONTEXT

Even if health care facilities have healthy eating policies, the use of some frying oils is often inevitable. Although they are not considered hazardous waste, used cooking oils must be properly disposed of. Improper disposal can create problems and additional costs:

  • - Oils can block drains, causing floods and bad odours. They can also overload waste water purification plants
  • - If untreated before entering the water system, oils can pollute streams and rivers and be toxic to wildlife
  • - If thrown in the garbage, oils can disturb some waste treatment systems

Some companies are specialised in the recovery and recycling of cooking oils. According to the spokesman of Sanimax, vegetable cooking oils are recovered and treated at Sanimax plants in Quebec and Ontario (Hamilton). Oils are decanted, filtered and purified. The fats are then used to make soaps, biofuels, oleic, stareic or linoleic acid.

SELF-ASSESSMENT QUESTIONS AND BEST PRACTICES [accordion clicktoclose="true"] [accordion-item title="What quantities do you produce by department?"]
  • Quantities by department?
  • Do you know the generated quantities per year?
Example: The CIUSSS of Nord-de-l’Ile de Montreal (facilities of CSSS Coeur de L’Ile) Used cooking oils are generated by food services on 3 sites, which are the hospital Jean Talon, the “living/accommodation “centre Paul Gouin (for the elderly) and the Centre Auclair. About 300 to 400 litres used cooking oil are generated per year. [/accordion-item] [accordion-item title="How do you currently recover/treat it?"]
  • Do you know if you currently recover (reuse, recycle) this material?
  • In what containers do you store this material?
  • How many containers do you have?
  • Where are they on the health care facility?
  • What do you do when containers are full?
  • Are the containers freely provided by your supplier?
Example: The CIUSSS of Nord-de-l’Ile de Montreal (facilities of CSSS Coeur de L’Ile) The facility recovers the used cooking oils, putting it in boilers or in 240 L brown bins near the kitchens. Once the containers are full, food services calls the service supplier. Containers are provided for free. [/accordion-item] [accordion-item title="With which company do you deal?"]
  • Do you know what supplier currently collect this material?
  • Did you sign a contract with this supplier?
  • Do you know the terms of the contract?
  • Are there some costs implied by the contract?
  • Have you ever done some unexpected visits to your supplier?
Example: The CIUSSS of Nord-de-l’Ile de Montreal (facilities of CSSS Coeur de L’Ile) Sanimax collects used cooking oils. No contract has been signed but they had a verbal agreement with the collector. Services are free. The facility has low royalties. Unexpected visits have occurred for inspection of how the material is treated. [/accordion-item] [accordion-item title="What about the future of the material?"]
  • Do you know where is the material sent after leaving your health care facility?
  • Do you demand an annual balance to know a about the precise future of the material (traceability)?
  • Have you made a procedure to ensure standardization and continuity of the collection system that you have implemented?
Example: The CIUSSS of Nord-de-l’Ile de Montreal (facilities of CSSS Coeur de L’Ile) The facility does not know what happens with the cooking oil once it leaves the premises. [/accordion-item] [/accordion]